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Paleo Rahmschnitzel!

4 comments

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Maybe Germany’s most famous contribution to gastronomy, besides the beverages produced by Augustiner and Hofbrau, which could each easily be a meal in themselves, is schnitzel (or arguably bratwurst because most people think Weiner schnitzel when they think schnitzel and that’s from Austria). Regardless of what most people think when they think German cuisine, the point is that i made paleo schnitzel tonight and would like to share my recipe with you.  (Clearly I’m missing practicing law because I’m countering my own points.)  Since moving to Germany, I’ve learned that there are many types of schnitzels (and even more types of brats).  My favorite type of schnitzel is rahmschnitzle, so I made that (with a twist).  I hope you like it!!  

 

Ingredients:

1 can coconut milk (with the coconut cream/fat still in there)

4 garlic cloves, minced

1 onion, chopped

A lot of mushrooms. I used shiitake and, while slicing them, realized that they also make the perfect mustache.

2 tablespoons fresh ginger

Salt and pepper to taste

1 cup coconut flour

1/4 cup shredded, unsweetened coconut

2 eggs

2 tbs basil or parsley

1/2 tbs salt

4 pieces of pork (or chicken or veal (but apparently you can only buy veal in Germany around Christmas and Easter))

A couple tbs coconut oil

 

Directions:

  • Hammer out any frustrations of the day by whacking the heck out of the pork. S has developed a highly technical method of covering a piece of pork with parchment paper and then hitting it repeatedly with an empty wine bottle until it reaches our desired thickness. Our neighbors hate us. Set the pork aside.

  • Place a pan over medium heat and add a tablespoon of coconut oil. Then add the garlic and the onions.

  • Once the onions are translucent, add the mushrooms and the coconut milk. If you want, and I highly recommend it, add some freshly grated ginger to the sauce after it’s simmered for about five minutes.  That’s the twist.  If you don’t like ginger or you want a more traditional rahmschnitzel, leave it out.  You could also thicken the sauce with some cream or coconut cream.

 

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  • While the sauce is simmering, mix the coconut flour, unsweetened shredded coconut, basil, and salt on a plate. In a separate bowl, whisk the eggs.

 

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  • Dip each piece of pork into the eggs and then lay it in the flour mix and flip it so that the flour covers both sides.

 

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  • Heat up a pan, I like to use a cast iron skillet, and add two tablespoons of coconut oil.

  • Once the pan is hot, add the breaded pork and brown each side, making sure to add additional oil as needed.

  • Pour as much rahmsauce as you want over your schnitzel and enjoy!

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I’d pair this dish with a nice German Riesling and either some french fries (or if you’re going to be really paleo, some sweet potato fries) or spargel (a white asparagus that pops up everywhere in Mainz in springtime) or broccoli.

Guten appetit!!

 

And I’ll leave you with a gallery of shiitake mustaches.

 

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Now S doesn’t have to wonder what I do during the day when I’m not in class….

 

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Posted by

I'm an American living in Mainz, Germany and, after a a one-year sabbatical from office life, working as a corporate lawyer in Frankfurt. While living in Europe with my fiancé, my goals are to see as much art, taste as much food, and experience as much life as possible.

4 Comments Join the Conversation

  1. We have a german restaurant here in Nashville and not knowing what to order, I went with the Weiner schnitzel. And yes, it was very tasty 🙂

    Reply

    • I’m so glad you liked the schnitzel in Nashville. I think if I lived there it’d be hard for me to eat anything but pulled pork bbq. I visited for a weekend a few years ago and couldn’t get enough of it! Thanks for reading!

      Reply

  2. hm… I love schnitzel and recently just posted a turkey schnitzel recipe. But yours looks amazing. The coconut does definitely give it an interesting twist because its not really used in German cooking. Cannot wait to give your recipe a try.

    Reply

    • Thank you! The coconut flour is really just a substitute for flour and, luckily for this dish does not give too much of a coconut flavor 🙂 Hope you like it!!

      Reply

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